Mini Digital Clock

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Learning the Greek Alphabet

Hello Everyone,

Here is a Youtube video I found that speaks it slowly, so you can see the letter and hear the sound pronunciation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FyEWbwBarQ

This is just so to help you, I think there is a couple of wrong pronunciations but I will ask Heidi to review this for me.  Good Luck with learning your alphabet.


Letter
Upper, lower
Name
Pronounced
When speaking,
sounds like
A, α
alpha
AHL-fah
ah
Β, β
vita
VEE-tah
the letter v
Γ, γ
gamma
GHAH-mah
the letter y when it comes before e, u, i; otherwise like a soft gargle gh
Δ, δ
thelta
THEL-tah
hard th as in "there"
Ε, ε
epsilon
EHP-see-lon
eh
Ζ, ζ
zita
ZEE-tah
the letter z
Η, η
ita
EE-tah
ee
Θ, θ
thita
THEE-tah
soft th as in "through"
Ι, ι
iota
YO-tah
ee
Κ, κ
kappa
KAH-pah
the letter k
Λ, λ
lamtha
LAHM-thah
the letter l
Μ, μ
mu
mee
the letter m
Ν, ν
nu
nee
the letter n
Ξ, ξ
xee
ksee
the letter x
Ο, ο
omikron
OH-mee-kron
oh
Π, π
pi
pee
the letter p
Ρ, ρ
ro
roh, roe
a rolled r
Σ, σ, ς
sigma
SEEGH-mah
the letter s
Τ, τ
tau
tahf
the letter t
Υ, υ
upsilon
EWP-see-lon
ee
Φ, φ
phi
fee
the letter f
Χ, χ
chi
hee
a light gargly ch as in "challah"
Ψ, ψ
psi
psee
ps as in "chips"
Ω, ω
omega
oh-MEH-ghah
somewhere between "awe" and "oh"
 

Common Diphthongs
ΑΥ, αυ
au
av or af
ΕΥ, ευ
eu
ev or ef
ΟΥ, ου
ou
oo
ΑΙ, αι
ai
eh

The words we learned:


kalimera = good morning - καλημέρα. Used both when coming to and going away from a place. 

kalispera = good afternoon - καλησπέρα. Used only when coming to a place or meeting someone in the evening or at night.

kalinihta = good night - καληνύχτα. Used only as a goodbye greeting in the evening or at night.


ya-ssou = hello or goodbye - γειά σου (greeting to one person or a friend)

ya-ssas = hello or goodbye - γειά σας (greeting to more persons or a more formal and polite way to greet an unknown person)

adio = goodbye - αντίο




Sunday, January 27, 2013

Current Events: Turkey


Crowds in Turkey gather to honor Kurds. Although they are a minority (and generally unsupported) group in many Middle Eastern states, the execution of three Kurdish people in Paris prompted a gathering of tens of thousands of people in the city of Diyarbakir. The government did not stop the rally, a sign that shows promise for peace talks between the Turkish government and the Kurdish people in Turkey. (January 18, 2013)

Support for Turkey joining the European Union is declining. According to a new survey conducted in Turkey as well as in Europe, the idea of joining the EU is losing its appeal even though increased efforts have been made to further free trade across borders and no longer require a Visa for to travel to European countries. Efforts to join were originally suggested to encourage political reform in Turkey about a range of issues that Europe has already adopted. (January 26, 2013)

Turkey concerned about pollution. It is said to be a major problem for 79 out of 81 of the provinces in Turkey. The primary cause for this is waste from industry as well as heavy traffic, problems that also contribute to water and soil pollution. Recently, sea turtles are becoming a larger concern after noticing altered migration patterns.  (January 1, 2013)

Conflict in Syria:
Although this primarily only impacts Eastern Turkey (not the areas where we are travelling) it is still an important issue to be aware of. The revolution, known as the Arab Spring, began in Tunisia and has spread throughout many Middle Eastern countries (notably, Egypt with Hosni Mubarak and Libya with Muammar el-Qaddafi) with the objective of revolting against the dictatorship governments. Many of these revolutions have already had much success, but the conflict in Syria against Dictator Bashar al Assad persists. Because Syria borders Turkey to the south, many of the conflicts occur close to the border. Additionally, Turkey serves as an inspiration as the ideal form of government for many of the Arab protesters, and a significant number of the refugees, from Syria in particular, are currently living in camps in Turkey where they can escape the conflict and experience better living conditions. Although this will not be an issue in the parts of the country that we will be travelling to, it is important to recognize the political situation in Turkey.

Sources:
New York Times
Hurriyet Daily News, Istanbul

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Current Events: Greece


As preparation for our trip in just three months, we thought that it would be a good idea to have a few current events posts, so we know what is happening in Greece & Turkey as we prepare for our travels.
Most of us know that Greece is in the midst of a financial crisis due to exceeding the restrictions set by the Eurozone for their budget deficit, as well as the rising tension in Turkey over Syria’s revolt against President Bashar-al-Assad. These posts will just provide additional information as these stories progress as well as about other interesting events happening in the area.


Media sources becoming targets for attacks. Last week, journalists’ homes were bombed by a group that had also raided a radio station earlier this month. The attacks are said to be a response to their coverage of austerity budget measures by the government. (January 12, 2013)

Shots fired into a government building in Athens. These attacks are also said to be motivated by the financial crisis, and by the belief that the government has failed to look into a list of people who have evaded taxes. So far, major opposition parties have not claimed responsibility for the attacks. (January 14, 2013)

Investigation underway about a former Finance Minister. George Papaconstantino is said to have removed his family members from the list of Greeks who have evaded taxes by holding Swiss bank accounts. A committee has been chosen to determine his possible indictment. (January 18, 2013)

Possible gold mine to be opened in Ierissos. A company from Canada who has recently opened copper, zinc, and lead mines in Greece hopes to also open a gold mine within the coming years. The decision is controversial because while it would provide as many as 1,500 jobs during a time when Greece faces many economic concerns, it also could damage plants, animals, and insects in the area.  Old mining operations have been said to pollute the land, water, and air. Opponents also worry about the potential for the price of gold to drop, which would mean that the economic benefits are not guaranteed to be as substantial as currently predicted. (January 13, 2013)


Keep watching on here, as next week I will be posting about Turkey. Also, remember our first class meeting will be Wednesday at 4pm. See you then!!

Source: New York Times